Social and natural science - Essay Example

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Social and natural science

The main difference between these sciences is seen in the object of their discussion and research. With regards to positivism, it is more relevant to explore new phenomena and analyze new objects on the basis of positive knowledge, which is based on observable facts. Therefore, social sciences should integrate logical principles for their researches; otherwise they would obtain irrelevant results. Logic and mathematical knowledge is more relevant to natural sciences, where the objects are more observable and determined. Positivism in the field of science A great contribution of positivism into philosophical and methodological explorative methods is considered further on the example of social and natural sciences. In sociology positivism is the core paradigmatic methodology. Science and inquiry are two basic pillars of positivism. Still, it is very important to solve the major problem of social sciences, which concerns results finding on the basis of complex species research and study. The roots of Positivism can be traced in the French Enlightenment (the abovementioned philosopher Auguste Comte is the founder of Positivism). The philosopher suggested combining natural sciences principles with social sciences (Delanty, 2005). Comte claimed that religion was conquered by science. ...
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Social and natural sciences Introduction The first and foremost role of positivism is objectivity. In spite of numerous interpretations of positivism, it is very important to realize a crucial component of this philosophical methodology. August Comte, a developer, a founder and a father of Positivism claimed that “positive” knowledge means “scientific” knowledge (Comte, 2003)…
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