Why does Lewis [Lewis Harry A. (1998) ‘Consciousness: Inexplicable – And Useless Too?’] object to Chalmers’ view of the ‘hard problem’?

Why does Lewis [Lewis Harry A. (1998) ‘Consciousness: Inexplicable – And Useless Too?’] object to Chalmers’ view of the ‘hard problem’? Essay example
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Philosophy
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Chalmers view on the hard problem Chalmer argues that state of consciousness does bring about one of the most alarming issues within the science involving the mind of human beings…

Introduction

He attributes all that we intimately know to the experience of conscience, yet he suggests that indeed, there is nothing so hard that lacks human explanation. Mental phenomena have always been vulnerable to the influence posed by scientific investigations. However, Chalmer debates that the consciousness has always found a way and reason to resist such things in a stubborn way. The explanations given by those considered scholarly have often failed to meet the required target1. He further states that many people have been lured into believing that problems are intractable and for that reason there is no way a formidable explanation exists. He supposes a direct confrontational approach to a problem solving. His view is that a problem could be isolated in terms of the hard part first where this part is separated from those parts that are considered tractable and an account given as to why it appears difficult to give a conclusive explanation of the problem. ...
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