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The Trial of Socrates - Essay Example

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The Trial of Socrates The text in ‘The Trial of Socrates’ is a situational reference from the history that narrates the revelations of Socrates as to how he is being accused wrongly of many things by the Athenians by stating his position about his deeds…

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The Trial of Socrates

He says that all the allegations have their birth from prejudice and resentment. To simplify their perspective conflicts, he explains all that caused widespread resentment and prejudice against him among those who believed they were wise. Socrates claims that he has got many people indignant because he proved that they were not wise (16). He did this empirical application of truth of wisdom with politicians, poets and artisans. Socrates claims that though they are good at their work, they do it by a certain innate power and inspiration and not by wisdom. Thus, Socrates establishes that it is God’s will for him to test all those who claim to be wise and prove that they are not really wise, as he believes only God to be wise. So, it is this indignation that caused all kinds of allegations against him. The second allegation against him is that he teaches people to disbelieve in Gods (17) and as alleged by Meletus that he corrupts the young people in Athens by teaching them so. In order to prove his stance, Socrates asks Meletus if anyone intentionally tries to get hurt, and Meletus promptly declines the chances of such an event. Then Socrates asks if no one loves to get hurt, how they can allege that he tries to make people around him bad and expect him to want to get himself hurt. ...
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