How does Socrates trial and punishment resemble those of Malcolm X? Whose journey was more important or more significant?

How does Socrates trial and punishment resemble those of Malcolm X? Whose journey was more important or more significant? Research Paper example
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Philosophy
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[Author’s Name] [Tutor’s Name] [Class] 13 October 2011 How does Socrates’ trial and punishment resemble those of Malcolm X? Whose journey was more important or more significant? Socrates’ trial and punishment are the two important elements in the study of ancient philosophy and culture…

Introduction

Both stood out of the crowd, sending the message of a profound mental and cultural change. Both surrendered themselves to the ideas they tried to communicate during their lives. Even if the death of Socrates was the product of legitimate trial and Malcolm X’s assassination was the result of a lynch-law, both punishments were the acts of human stupidity, killing talented leaders and making positive change virtually impossible. Some authors claim that the trial and punishment of Socrates resembles those of Malcolm X. The logic behind the claim is simple: both were prominent leaders and surrendered themselves to the ideas they were trying to communicate during their lives. Socrates lost his life, being confident that “wherever a man’s place is, whether the place which he has chosen or that in which he has been placed by a commander, there he ought to remain in the hour of danger; he should not think of death or anything but of disgrace” (Plato 9). Malcolm X, in turn, lost his life as a result of his natural striving toward justice and fairness, away from the political manipulation and deception. Those who say that the trial and punishment of Socrates and Malcolm X were similar are partially right. ...
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