Moral Virtues

Moral Virtues Essay example
College
Essay
Philosophy
Pages 4 (1004 words)
Download 0
The notion of moral virtues, or excellences, as a mean is an idea promulgated by Aristotle in the second half of Book II of the Nicomachean Ethics. From his account, one gathers that Aristotle believes the virtue is a perfect mean between a vice of excess and a vice of privation…

Introduction

In addition, when one realizes that Aristotle is attempting to inculcate good habits in people, along with a good state of character, a better context is drawn around his claims. That is, if one acts generally toward a mean of two vices, this will lead to a better outcome than acting toward vices. In modern terms, in which morality is cast as a matter of doing the right thing in various sorts of specific cases, this seems like an outdated model of conducting moral arguments. To the contrary, this idea of virtue as a mean—instead of virtue as right action—faces fewer destructive arguments than the latter perspective and is ultimately easier to defend philosophically. From an intuitive standpoint, Aristotle’s approach is appealing. Firstly, in our daily living, a moral action is one that depends on balance between two extremes. For example, the ideal middle ground between running into a burning building to saving people (stupidity) and doing nothing out of fear (cowardice) is the act of doing what you can reasonably do in order to save lives (bravery). Secondly, the mean is intuitive in itself in all cases. Our language is broad enough to encompass all possible middle grounds between vices that we might consider excesses. ...
Download paper
Not exactly what you need?

Related papers

Aristotle's ethics
Happiness is the central core of living, which depends entirely on cultivation of virtues. According to Aristotle, playing the mean is the way of cultivating virtues that includes moral virtues for the attainment of individual happiness. Human beings make choices depending on the circumstances that surround them by choosing on one option and neglecting the other. Aristotle believed that his task…
Philosophy assignment
In his writing, Allegory of the Cave, found in The Republic, Plato referred to mimics as artificial replicas of certain real things. Next, based on discussion, explain how Plato might respond to this problem, and explain how this rebuttal nevertheless leads to the second problem of the so-called “participation problem” in respect to the Theory of the forms. From the discussion above, Plato…
Virtue In Ancient Philosophy
For example, human beings acquire virtue obeying the law and living to the expectation of societal norms and values. Human beings admire acquired virtues over natural virtues depending on the circumstances they find themselves in. For example, some people practices sobriety to live well with others, with the same objective, they teach their children good principles. 2. What, for Plato, are the…
Theory of Ethics Essay
Happiness is the central core of living, which depends entirely on cultivation of virtues. According to Aristotle, playing the mean is the way of cultivating virtues that includes moral virtues for the attainment of individual happiness. Playing the mean is the virtue between two extreme excesses and deficiency. For instance, exercising the act of justice in getting too little or getting too much.…
Socrates, Are You Happy?
Human perfection is thus a product of perfection of the intellect. The following paper discusses the just occasion of Socrates’ view that a morally good person is happier than the morally bad person. This will be followed by a personal philosophical worry related to his justification. DISCUSSION Socrates’ view of the relation between virtues and happiness is that good morals are necessary for…
Human Rationalism by Aristotle
The soul is not kind of body, but cannot exist independently without a body. According to Aristotle, reason is inborn and exists in human beings through an induction process that begins with a sense experience. For instance, Aristotle demonstrates that experience grants medical practitioners the capability to carry out accurate medical diagnosis when compared with medical theorists of layman.…
Free Will and Moral Responsibility
Whether David Hume believes that freedom of action is sufficient for moral responsibility has become a point of much contention amongst Hume scholars. Hume's account of moral responsibility is complex. He outlines a remarkably unorthodox framework within which to understand moral sentiments and responsibility. Within this framing he addresses the problem of freedom and offers a distinct account of…