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Morals, Utilitarianism, Social - Essay Example

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High school
Essay
Philosophy
Pages 4 (1004 words)

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Name of the student: Philosophy: Date: Morals, Utilitarianism, Social A father is travelling upcountry with his family (two daughters and wife) to spend the festivities with his extended family. His nine-year-old daughter was adopted following a delay in your wife conceiving but two years later, his wife conceived…

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Morals, Utilitarianism, Social

His nine year old adopted daughter is not bleeding but she has is slowly passing out and is complaining that she is feeling dizzy, cannot breath properly and her vision is hazy. The ambulance arrives and can only competently attend to one patient, take her to the nearest hospital, which is 20 kilometers away, and come for the other victim. If they take his seven year old daughter, it is relative his nine year old daughter will make it that long. His seven-year-old daughter is his real daughter and there is that risk that she might pass out if they take his nine-year-old daughter first. He is torn between which is a lesser wrong; letting his adopted daughter who is at the verge of becoming vegetative be left behind, or his seven year old daughter who is bleeding profusely. Utilitarian theories are based on utility, which is aimed at generating excellent results. These theories intend to maximize the good in every situation by selecting the best possible alternative, while curtailing the negative alternatives to an event. Utilitarian theory associate a good act with happiness and a bad act with sadness, and use this to determine if an action to be performed is morally right or morally wrong. If the net effect will lead to happiness, then it is morally right but if it will lead to sadness, then it is morally wrong (Hull 1-10). ...
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