The Moral Implications of Oretga and Gasset's Account of Barbarism

The Moral Implications of Oretga and Gasset
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The moral implications of Oretga and Gasset's account of barbarism What is barbarism? Barbarism may be defined as acts of destruction and violence that takes shape in the society when a civilization reaches the high point of culture. Barbarism serves as a point when a civilized society falls.


For example, missionaries of humanity civilize savage race by using sword and fire because there is no other method than violence to transform the savage people from their way of life. After applying these violent methods, principles of civilization gradually develops and creates various forms of a human being’s spiritual manifestation that are called philosophy, religion, art and science and other forms of social life that enable an individual to enjoy freedom, security, leisure and self manifestation in greater spheres of activity. Thus barbarism transforms itself into civilization. As mentioned earlier, civilization is the beginning of all principles and ideas and all the knowledge for this transformation comes from the ideas preserved during the previous civilization. However, simultaneous to the beginning of civilization destruction and violence also arises and as a result, barbarism grows along with civilization. The parallel growth of barbarism side by side with the civilization can be easily traced in our society. In ancient times, the savage used to kill his enemy and in the cultured times, man has a wide range of technical devices, explosives, aero planes, poisonous gas and submarines to get rid of the enemy. These sophisticated weapons are the modern forms of the club and they are different only in the power and action. ...
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