Retribution for Slaves - Essay Example

Only on StudentShare

Extract of sample
Retribution for Slaves

Nonetheless, the discussion in this paper focuses on retributions for the descendants of historic slavery, since it is held and debated more frequently. Historic slaves in the U.S. performed instinctive labor with no pay, which is against human rights. They were, therefore, at liberty to reparation and, since they are deceased, the money must go to their offspring. The idea does not stop to be correct in due course—legitimacy and justice do not terminating dates. The most significant idea is to ascertain whether the principle of retribution is right. A retribution court case against the United States treasury department was discharged in 1915, but later in 1920s reparation was made a section of Black Nationalist program by Marcus Garvey. The current discussion over retribution was intensified by Randall Robinson’s publication called “The Debt.” According to Robinson (17), the worth of slave labor for more than 246 years of American historic slavery is more than trillions of dollars. He illustrated that slaves historic slaves were responsible for the picking and processing of cotton that fueled trade and industry in the United States. ...
Download paper

Summary

Your name Retribution for Slaves Retributions are an extremely intricate and controversial topic. It is worth noting that slavery was eradicated in the United Sates in 1865 by the Universal Declaration of Human Rights…
Author : bulah66

Related Essays

Civil Rights Era Struggle
However, with the landing of westerners in Africa, slave trade increased with the Africans having no apparent knowledge of the consequences it had on the slaves sold. This is because they had no way of knowing the conditions under which the slaves were kept, but knew only that it was good riddance. In the course of slavery, especially during the journey across the Atlantic ocean, slaves were mistreated, some died, and others fell ill while others were sexually violated. During the trip across the vast ocean, conditions in which the slaves were subjected to be far worse than they were in...
4 pages (1004 words) Essay
Capital Punishment Punishment In The Light Of Kant's Deontology.
Advocates of death penalty argue that death penalty is the need of the time as homicides and serious offences are at an increasing rate and that the provision for capital punishment can act as the strongest corrective measure or deterrence. Similarly, the retributive belief that death penalty is essential to preserve retributive justice whereby murderers get the full punishment they deserve and the utilitarian argument that death penalty deters or is necessary to incapacitate prospective criminals have also emphasized the need for capital punishments. On the other hand, the major argument...
3 pages (753 words) Essay
Theories of punishment
Crime and punishment consider the philosophical concept of cause and effect. Crime causes suffering, pain, and losses to someone. Punishment also causes suffering, pain, and losses (“Crime”). Punishment is the effect in the form of penalty inflicted on an offender through a judicial procedure. Society imposes retribution on an individual who committed an act that public laws forbid. Society has numerous answers to the issue why an offender should be punished. Some of them are to stop them from committing further crimes, tell the victims that the society disapproves the act, and share their...
3 pages (753 words) Term Paper
Why does Mackie think we need an "error theory"? Do you think he is right to believe that we need it?
The error theory suggests that morals are not absolute, that what is morally right or wrong vary from one society to another. It is a theory that states that morals are judged, not by the universal moral norms, but according to the society within which a circumstance calls for moral clarification (Dorsey 2006, p.495). When one considers the definition above, it can be stated that the morals are no longer absolute in different societies because of the fact that they have evolved over a long period, changing considerably from one society to another. A good number of the proponents of this...
12 pages (3012 words) Essay
Portrayal of guilt and retribution
Thus fantastic elements are added and metaphorically situated within the two stories to stray away from the sense of what is practical or what is practically considered to be "right" and the abundance of fantastic depictions therefore creating a conflict between the self and the society - thus drawing the connection with the Kantian philosophy of the State, justice and moral nature of man....
9 pages (2259 words) Essay
Plato's View of Democracy
The Plato's View on Democracy ...
10 pages (2510 words) Essay
Got a tricky question? Receive an answer from students like you! Try us!