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Justification and Crisis of Modern Science - Essay Example

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College
Author : eleonoreheaney
Essay
Philosophy
Pages 5 (1255 words)

Summary

Justification and Crisis of Modern Science Insert Name Tutor Institution Date Justification and Crisis of Modern Science John Locke was a prominent influence in western culture through his philosophical woks and theoretical thinking. However, it was hard to identify his true nature because no one could tell if he was a Deist, a Christian or Unitarian…

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Justification and Crisis of Modern Science

He clearly understood the Deists and was greatly influenced by the brilliant Unitarians in social concepts. Rene Descartes on the other hand was known to be the vicar of modern science. He initiated a new clear means of thinking about science and philosophy through ignoring all notions centered on supposition or emotional conviction and concurring with the ideas proved by direct observation (Dunn, 1999). The ultimate aim of this paper is to examine how John Locke attempted to justify modern science in terms of bringing in his own ideas and views as a way to bridge the gap between Descarte’s res cogitans and res extensa. It also examines the way he was opposed by several other scholars Locke’s Justification of Modern Science John Locke was one of the most influential especially in An Essay about Human Understanding (1690), fundamentally rejected the Cartesian theory of the continuation of innate notions – like that of God, or time without end – and upholded that the infant during birth has no any form of knowledge and he compared it to a blank page, and in severe terms, it does not stay alive yet. It is important to note that when he selects the subject of his title, Locke never used the term “mind” which could propose a notion of something really stays alive like an object or a permanent structure (Dunn, 1999). ...
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