Theodicy and the Free Will Defense - Essay Example

Only on StudentShare

Extract of sample
Theodicy and the Free Will Defense

This paper deems to tackle the concepts revolving around theodicy and free will; this also aims to know whether the free will defense meet all the three criteria for an effective theodicy. Free Will Human free will and freely chosen good actions are of high value, even though free will opens up the possibility of evil (Pinnock 5). Furthermore, as guided by the definition of freedom, free will or free act is an act that is not determined casually in any way by one’s genetic makeup, by one’s environment or even by God (Pinnock 5). Likewise, every free person is possibly sinful and free to choose evil; thus, given the independence of human freedom from divine control, it is obviously impossible for God to guarantee that individuals will always freely choose to do what is morally noble (Pinnock 5). In simple terms, Pinnock implied that free will is considered as a key justification to evil (4). Individuals deem that they have free will if they view themselves as agents capable of influencing the world in a variety of ways (Kane 5). Moreover, persons feel that it is up to them what they will choose and how they will act and this means they could have chosen and acted otherwise (Kane 5). ...
Download paper

Summary

Name Professor Philosophy Date Theodicy and the Free Will Defense Theodicy as defined by Pinnock (5) seeks to know the actual reasons why God permits evil. Likewise, Birnbaum defined theodicy as the accepted name for the entire subject comprising the problem of evil and its attempted resolution (3)…
Author : kelli13

Related Essays

Alvin Plantinga's Free Will Defense
Platinga demonstrates how theistic belief, about God being omnipotent and wholly good, is logically consistent. Permitting evil means creating a world with moral good, as well as, moral evil. This is an argument that answers the questions raised by different philosophers, or defends itself against some philosophers, with contradictory ideas about the existence of evil and the role of God. In the logical problem of evil, it is indicated that there are different possibilities to the existence of evil. Some of these mentioned are that God: can eliminate evil but he is adamant, wants to eliminate...
8 pages (2008 words) Essay
The Problem of Evil
The “all-good,” the “all-powerful,” etc., are claims to justifying the creator who made the world of all possible worlds. Theodicy involves these traditional arguments and weighs these arguments against the scale of the problem of evil. G.W. Leibniz is a case in point. According to Leibniz, this world, no matter how imperfect, is actually the best of all possible worlds that God would have created in any way. More so, Leibniz’s optimistic theodicy does not see the existence of evil in the world as fundamentally counting against God’s existence. Therefore, evil, as it were, becomes...
6 pages (1506 words) Term Paper
Sartre's Defense of Existentialism
Nevertheless, Sartre’s response to the objection that his existentialism makes all choice arbitrary is not only good but also sensible. Sartre interprets the objection that confronts him and his existentialism – “It does not matter what you do” – in three ways: “First they tax us with anarchy; then they say, ‘You cannot judge others, for there is no reason for preferring one purpose to another’; finally, they may say, ‘Everything being merely voluntary in this choice of yours, you give away with one hand what you pretend to gain with the other’” (Sartre 13). The first...
6 pages (1506 words) Essay
Free Will
This is in relation to the creation of the perfect conditions and circumstances that lead to the various actions and events in which man participates and engages. This is in the belief of having freedom of choice to make a free decision, as to what one want. However, it is not the case as all events are present beyond one’s control in the form of having the past play a crucial role in the future. In light of this, if one were given sufficient and comprehensive information on every particle that influences his or her decisions, it would be remotely possible to come up with every scenario that...
4 pages (1004 words) Essay
Insanity defense
249). This defense has posed an insoluble problem to the criminal justice system – Contrary to the criminal law which seeks to punish the criminal; the insanity defense seeks to excuse the criminal of responsibility (Fersch, 2005). Affirming the crucial importance of criminal intent in defining a crime, this term paper contends that insanity defense is morally justified and necessary because without this justice may be unwittingly denied. Insanity Defenses The recognition and standard of insanity defense vary across states and have changed through the years: From the M’Naghten rule (1841)...
4 pages (1004 words) Term Paper
Defense Paper: David Hume
Every person has his own perception of the world, thus, he/she may have his/her own experience. Hume states that we all have our own views and there are no two views which are actually the same. From here Hume derives his attitude towards scientific knowledge. His view of knowledge also raised indignation and misunderstanding among scholars as the philosopher stated that there is nothing certain in our world. This statement calls all the scientific discoveries into question. Thus, the question is how we should understand Hume. The given paper will try to prove that David Hume is right and...
4 pages (1004 words) Essay
EVIL
Therefore, even the ideal moral judge like God has to draw arbitrary line even when deciding on the number of evil things he would allow; therefore, the vague line guarantees that some evils in the world are gratuitous (Sullivan 398-402). Inwagen’s strategy and enlightenments to the evil problem are very significant in enhancing people’s understanding, and rather than giving an entirely critical response, he offers contributions and then explains their significance. Inwagen condemns the normal taxonomy regarding the problem of evil and provides a substitute all of which are important...
8 pages (2008 words) Essay
Got a tricky question? Receive an answer from students like you! Try us!