on Moral and Ethics - Essay Example

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on Moral and Ethics

The mind-body problem according to Descartes the human bodies were likened to machinery that worked on their own rules taking no lead from anything else. This he explained giving an example of the involuntary actions that make the body get into action. He pointed out the reflex action of a human being could not have included the mind since the external stimuli activate the nerve ending of the body and force them to act. However, although the body was free, there were situations where the mind worked as a lever exerting pressure on the body to make it bend to the demands of the mind. According to Descartes, the body was physical, could be influenced by other material properties while the mind was non-physical, and, therefore, did not fall prey of any natural laws. Rene attributed the interaction of the body and the mind to the pineal gland found in the brain, as this is not duplicated in the other side of the brain and, therefore, provided a unifying factor in the interaction. He believed this interaction made it possible for the mind to exert influence over the body and make it act in a certain way. He also stated that the body was also capable of influencing the mind, which is rather rational, and forcing it into action through an act of passion.
Following the assertions made by Descartes, Hobbes disagreed on the aspect of the immaterial mind and sates that the mind is made up of sense, imagination, and the working of language and it does not consist of any other rational characteristic other than these. ...
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The researcher of this descriptive essay mostly focuses on the discussion of the topic of Moral and Ethics and analyzing the issue of the mind–body problem that is an important aspect in philosophy, which seeks to understand the relationship between the mind and body…
Author : federicoharvey

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