Got a tricky question? Receive an answer from students like you! Try us!

Plato's The Apology - Essay Example

Only on StudentShare
Author : meggie97

Summary

Name Professor Module Date Plato’s The Apology: A Critical review of Socrates’ Stances The Gadfly Metaphor: In his defense, Socrates compares himself to a gadfly, and he states, “a great and noble steed who is tardy in his motions owing to his very size, and requires to be stirred into life” (Smith and Knapp 17)…

Extract of sample
Plato's The Apology

This metaphor occupies a pivotal place in philosophy study and practice (Ilea 6). Socrates stance is that the role of a philosopher in the society is parallel to that of a gadfly in stimulating a horse. As gadflies, philosophers have the responsibility of challenging the society to think clearly about things which may otherwise be taken for granted. Philosophers question the inconsistencies and fallacies that are acceptable to the rest of the society (8). Upham (71) supports this view of the Socratic gadfly, stating that philosophy involves uncovering assumptions, asking pertinent and unwelcome questions alongside mocking self seriousness. The analogy is immensely strong, as the gadfly is deemed irritating in a similar fashion by which philosophy in this approach may be quite unwelcome. The gadfly metaphor is of significant value in the academic and intellectual pursuit of philosophy since it spells out philosophers’ roles. This helps in defining practice of philosophy; without it, philosophy may be solely constrained to knowledge seeking and having no roles in society (72). ‘…the unexamined life is not worth living.’: In Socrates proposal for his sentence, he ponders the question of whether he should stop practicing philosophy and go into exile. ...
Download paper

Related Essays

Plato's Apology
1.2. Socrates’ method was to approach every known wise man and interview him in order to find one wiser than him. In asking a series of questions, he is able to deduce the speaker’s wisdom (21c) 1.3. Socrates found that when he probed each wise man with questions, he always discovered a fault in his ideas, which showed him not wiser than Socrates (21d-e) 1.4. Socrates surmised what the Delphic oracle meant by him being wiser than the other ‘wise men.’ “I am wiser than that other fellow, because neither of us knows anything of great value; but he thinks he knows a thing when he…
3 pages (753 words)
Plato’s Apology.
An individual named Meletus, who had accused him of corrupting the Athenian youth, had brought Socrates to trial. The Apology then represents the entirety of Socrates’ argument to the court to prove his innocence and demonstrate the absurdity of Meletus claims against him. This essay contextualizes the claims that have been made against Socrates and considers whether or not he is guilty of them. The Apology begins with Socrates expending considerable effort to demonstrate how he came to partake in his role as an expounder of wisdom and intellectual thought. He describes how a truth-teller…
3 pages (753 words)
Plato's Republic Philosophy Essay
In other words, the Republic by Plato is primarily a treatise about the formation of man. It is a political work not in the conventional sense, but in the sense as Socrates makes it understandable. However, the huge educational truth, which is clearly represented in the Republic - is a strong correlation of the image of man and space where the person is placed. It is not only an artistic principle, but it is also a moral law. The main thesis is that a perfect man can be formed only in a perfect state, and vice versa: the creation of the perfect state is the problem of a man forming. This is…
5 pages (1255 words)
Socrates Apology Essay
He was brought in on four primary charges, namely, that he is spreading sacrilegious ideas in the marketplace, that he is associating with the Sophists, that he is corrupting the young, and that he does not honor the gods of Athens. Surprisingly, this man did not choose to flee the city in the common form of resisting arrest and instead chose to appear before the court and speak in his own defense. It is generally considered a poor choice to have the accused speak for himself, and it could be argued that Socrates didn't do himself any favors in attempting to present his case. However, after…
5 pages (1255 words)
Apology
Yet another account of the trial is given by Aristophanes, a comic playwright. The philosopher was a member of the sub-council – the Council of Five Hundred – that ruled over the Assembly. His morals, way of thinking did not create much of a fuss at first. He did all that he thought was right, nothing more and then a time came when Athens was under attack and Sparta won the battle. The Greeks were humiliated and angry, especially when Socrates did not seem to approve of their form of government. He was considered as a critic of the then governmental system of Greece and due to this and…
5 pages (1255 words)
Apology Plato
Such a realization by Plato illustrates man’s weakness at a commission of fault but failure of its admission due to the general consensus of state with a reputed foundation that may not be shaken and the strength of pride among its members whose pure intelligence became corrupted with arrogance. It would be quite apparent after reading and analyzing the text that Plato attempts to convey how the impact of the ‘Apology of Socrates’ guides and substantiates his own wisdom on what could make the capacity for evolving knowledge turn into a desire for destructive gain rather than…
Socrates Apology
It goes without saying that the whistleblowers like Socrates give voice to the collective conscience of the societies they live in and happen to be the primary harbingers of all the truth and goodness prevailing in them. In Apology Socrates is brought to trial for corrupting the youth and not believing in God. Socrates responds to this trial by enunciating his point in a factual and straight forward manner, thereby declaring that though he happened to be a man of limited wisdom, yet he considered it to be his duty to question and test the veracity of the dominant dictums and dogmas prevalent…
3 pages (753 words)