What is the Divine Command Theory and How Might Socrates' Dilemma Be Supposes to Undermine it?

What is the Divine Command Theory and How Might Socrates
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Philosophy
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The Divine Command Theory comprises the claim that ethics are ultimately based on the orders or nature of God, and that the morally right act is the one that God commands.This view is one that binds morals and religion as one…

Introduction

This view is one that binds morals and religion as one. This often provides a comfort zone for most people as it presents a solution to darned arguments on moral relativism and the detachment of ethics. This theory also asserts that morality is somehow reliant upon God and that moral accountability consists in deference to God’s commands. The clear content of these divine commands differs according to the religion and the precise views of an individual divine command theorist; all versions of the theory hold in common the claim that morality and ethical obligation depends on God in the end. The issue of the probable links between religion and morals is of interest to ethical theorists, as well as those of religion, but it also guides us to regard the function of beliefs in humanity and the nature of moral consideration. Given this, the arguments presented for and against DCT have both hypothetical and realistic significance. This paper starts by vividly defining DCT, looking into Socrates’ refutations of the theory, while also explaining how his dilemma might undermine the DCT and how the theory is still salvageable in spite of Socrates’ critique. We finally end this with a clear conclusion that gives a summary of the discussion. Some of the renowned religious thinkers such as St. Thomas Aquinas discarded the divine command theory because of the mere rational dilemmas presented here. ...
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