Aristotle and Plato on Realism

Aristotle and Plato on Realism Essay example
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Aristotle and Plato on Realism The ancient Greek world was one of burgeoning intellectual enterprise. A number of the most noted philosophers from around the world have been impacted with the work of Greek philosophers. This influence continues from the time of these philosophers to the present day indicating the intellectual weight of these ideas…

Introduction

When Aristotle and Plato are contrasted, it becomes clear that their efforts were largely responsible for the inclusion of metaphysical inquiry into Western philosophical thought. Both philosophers provided highly differing views on reality and the way it could be conceptualised but this does not serve to indicate that their views were altogether opposed to each other. Instead, there are fine lines where both Plato and Aristotle tend to agree and other areas where they tend to disagree. This paper will explore areas where both philosophers tend to agree on the domain of realism. Plato held that the ultimate reality behind an object were notions or concepts of that object. He argued that things in the physical world are merely abstract representations of various kinds of universal concepts. It could be argued that Plato thought that in order to understand reality it was necessary to approach the world of various ideas. This method of interpreting reality has been labelled as Platonic realism where ideas are given greater preference to the physical object in ruder to perceive reality. Plato also holds that the true nature of reality revolves around the idea that abstract universals create the physical reality. ...
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