Meno's Paradox and Socrates Theory of Recollection

Meno
Undergraduate
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Philosophy
Pages 4 (1004 words)
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Name Course Instructor Date Meno’s Paradox Meno’s paradox and Socrates theory of recollection is an argument in the form of a question. It is possible to learn because one is not aiming to discover new knowledge that he or she does not know, rather one is uncovering such knowledge which, can be said as remembering latent knowledge that has been forgotten…

Introduction

This evidenced in the argument between Meno and Socrates, whereby, they both agree on prior knowledge. Meno can be referred to as Socratic dialogue written by Plato. It aims to find the definition of arete or virtue. In this regard, it means virtue in general manner rather than particular virtues such as temperance and justice. In response to Meno’s paradox, Socrates comes up with new ideas of immortality of the soul, the theory on knowledge as a recollection, which Socrates illustrates by posing a mathematical puzzle to one of Meno’s slaves. In this paradox, Socrates tries to find a distinction between true belief and knowledge. In this dialogue, Meno suggests that inquiry is not possible. The argument that meno brings forth is known as meno’s paradox. As a solution to this disturbing paradox, Socrates constructs a theory of recollection (Meno 71). Meno asks Socrates whether virtue can be taught. In response, Socrates says that he does not know anything like virtue and in his entire life; he has never known anyone who is virtuous. In their argument, Meno tries to define virtue as power of command with exceptions in that there are virtues for those who command and those who obey and that the power of command must be exercised either justly or unjustly. ...
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