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Can freedom of speech, as an absolute right, be defended on utilitarian terms? If not, can Ronald Dworkin defend it as a 'fundam - Research Paper Example

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Ph.D.
Author : aniyah68
Research Paper
Philosophy
Pages 5 (1255 words)

Summary

Can freedom of speech, as an absolute right, be protected on utilitarian terms? If not, can Ronald Dworkin defend it as a ‘fundamental human right’? Table of contents Abstract………………………………………………………………………………3 Introduction………….……………………………………………………………….4 1…

Extract of sample
Can freedom of speech, as an absolute right, be defended on utilitarian terms? If not, can Ronald Dworkin defend it as a 'fundam

..…………………….10 Abstract This paper concentrates on the notion of freedom of speech and how its functioning has been elucidated in a synchronized manner. The paper also entails the analysis of how freedom of speech as an absolute right can be defended on the utilitarian ground. The last part deals with the critical evaluation of how the famous liberal scholar, Ronald Dworkin, defended the freedom of speech as a fundamental human right and how far he is able to achieve his goal. The general intellection of almost all philosophers today is that human beings with the virtue of their nature possess moral rights in terms of both special rights (for example, the right of a creditor to collect his money from debtor) and general rights. According to the majority of the philosophers, the general notion of belief is that there is compatibility between utilitarianism and moral rights. For instance, the famous British philosopher John Stuart Mill, whose contribution is immense in the field of philosophy, perceives a congruency between utilitarianism and moral rights. ...
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