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How Does DesCartes Use the Example of Wax to Reinforce His Argument of the Existence of the Self? - Term Paper Example

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Complete How does Descartes use the example of wax to reinforce his argument of the existence of the self? Rene Descartes essentially presented his arguments with joint consideration of the method of doubt and of analysis, venturing to cut into ‘skepticism’ by demonstrating that if one were to take a systematized path to the unknown truths he initially doubted, then the process eventually leads to the discovery of truths which no doubts may hold any further…

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How Does DesCartes Use the Example of Wax to Reinforce His Argument of the Existence of the Self?

Descartes, Meditations on First Philosophy) This is all the more reinforced when Descartes came up with the “wax argument” in substantiating his proof on the existence of the self. To Descartes, the program of radical doubt must be established on a solitary endeavor or more appropriately, a deliberate isolation which forms the nature of his philosophical work having been freed of social or emotional disturbances enabling him to inquire “What shall I say of the mind itself, that is, of myself? For as yet I do not admit that I am anything but mind. ...
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