Can We Attain Happiness Without God? - Essay Example

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Can We Attain Happiness Without God?

They perceive that the attainment of the happiness is dependent on the attainment of the presence of God in our lives in certain manner. The religious teachings and the normal points of the view differ in achievement of the happiness. A majority of the religions speak of the importance of God as the primal force behind the attainment of the happiness. There are a number of prominent philosophers, like Aristotle; who have propagated that happiness is a state of mind. This forms the base of the contradictory nature of the definition of happiness. The Christian teachings place a lot of importance on the seeking of God as a means of happiness (Milton 179). This can be attributed to the basic view of God as a driving force of this universe. This also emanates from the fact that God as seen as an omnipotent being who does well to all. This essential property qualifies him as a quintessential source of happiness. The contemporary philosophers like Voltaire have pointed to the material nature of happiness (Olson 201). They also argue that happiness is a state of the mind. Some have an external locus of happiness, as for example, the material possessions, money, clothes and wife. For some others, it is internal in nature. ...
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CAN WE ATTAIN HAPPINESS WITHOUT GOD? The attainment of happiness is one of the most important desires of any human being. Happiness can be found out in a number of areas of daily life ranging from the material possessions of a man to the deeds of a human. The needs of the happiness among the human beings are highly subjective…
Author : jeromeferry

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