Hobbes and Absolute Sovereignty

Hobbes and Absolute Sovereignty  Essay example
Masters
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Philosophy
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Hobbes and absolute Sovereignty Name Institution Course Tutor Date Hobbes and absolute sovereignty Thomas Hobbes has been considered a great philosopher among the England philosophers. Born in April 5th, 1588 and died in December 4th 1679. During this period Hobbes made revolutionary advancements in the field of philosophy…

Introduction

He criticised several fields and gave argumentative ideas including sovereign governments which this work will be based upon. Sovereign is a state of a people or societies where a group of people or a person has been designated the authority to govern. The sovereign body always has control in religion, finance and military of the society. In this set up, the magistrate does not pledge allegiance to any superior forces or power and he is according to the state orders supreme. The control in the three sections by someone who has not been designated as sovereign in the social sense may as well assume the position of sovereignty. As stated by Hobbes in Behemoth, he gives a difference between de jure and de facto sovereign. Hobbes, felt that naturally the society cannot be differentiated from state of nature which is always at war. This is a condition whereby people are being forced to be in contact without an authority that is superior. The presence of the sovereign was therefore meant to prevent this state of commotion. The erected sovereign was to be given the subject’s rights and was expected create peace by all means. The idea of Hobbes was that sovereign which is absolute had limited power specifically by power which was assumed to be greater. ...
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