Aristotle's Concept of Happiness

Aristotle
High school
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Philosophy
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Name Instructor’s Name Philosophy 25 May 2012 Aristotle’s Concept of Happiness People have different opinions of the best, happiest and most worthwhile kind of life for human beings. Happiness in life tends to be measured in terms of honorable achievements and pleasures and excitements of service to the community, material productiveness, luxury, happy personal relationships and other factors but an agreement on the principal factor to measure happiness and what is best for human beings is necessary (Broadie 3)…

Introduction

Aristotle uses Nicomachean Ethics in his theory of happiness to defend the view he takes on happiness. He begins by creating a big illusion that all things aim at some good. By saying that all things aim at some good, Aristotle means that everything has some aim or end to be achieved and the restricted good which every activity intends to achieve actuates the nature of that activity. Aristotle gives an example of health and the practice of medicine, the main aim of medical science is to attain health for everyone and health is in itself a good. Therefore the aim of medical science is good. Activities carried out in the real world achieve something desirable otherwise they would not be practiced. According to Aristotle, activities are hierarchically related to other activities and ends to ends (Broadie 11). Some ends are therefore subordinate to others. Hedonists and non-hedonists would disagree on what is subordinate to what between virtue and pleasure. Aristotle’s approach focuses on subordination-relations to cover individuals with different ethical attitudes. ...
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