Three Dialogues Between Hylas and Philonous by Berkeley

Three Dialogues Between Hylas and Philonous by  Berkeley  Essay example
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Name Professor’s Name Subject Date Berkeley’s “Three Dialogues between Hylas and Philonous” Introduction The paper deals with the “Three Dialogues between Hylas and Philonous” by George Berkley. The author makes a great emphasis on the problem of ambiguity…

Introduction

Further on I will explain the importance of both materialistic and immaterialistic explanations of the objects and trying to find the most persuading argument, either materialistic or sensual one. Part A The main argument of Berkley is that idealism refers to daily practices and is inconsistent with science, while materialism is focused on the identity of the object and is a trigger for studying the laws of nature. Hylas claims that different senses provide individuals with diversity of perceptions and knowledge about the one and the same thing. He is a materialist in his essence and throughout the dialogue he tries to persuade Philonus of the need to be closer to the matter and not to the wanderings of one’s mind. The unity of ideas about a particular thing is an integrative element for delving into the depth of the nature of things.. He introduces a character of Hylas, which is a materialist and Philonous, which is an immaterialist. Hylas claims that from a materialistic point of view to see something with the help of the microscope is to see the same thing, which can be seen with the naked eye. Philonous opposes to him and argues that if to refer to our senses and emotions, we will see different things with and without microscopes. Still, the role of microscope cannot be denied. It plays a role of correlation of different perceptions of one thing. ...
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