A reflection of "Being and Nothingness" and "Woman as the Other"

A reflection of "Being and Nothingness" and "Woman as the Other" Essay example
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Philosophy
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. A lot of effort has been put in trying to champion feminism, and maybe people should look at it with caution. It is still debated; however, for the large chunk of the literature published in the twentieth last century appears to have contributed to address the dilemma…

Introduction

The philosopher’s overriding factor in penning the book was to underscore the fundamental liberty of the human person, going against determinism. Sartre philosophies presented in the book were derived from Martin Heidegger; the latter provided an ontological analysis through the perception and approach of Husserlian principle. In his investigation in Being and Nothingness, Sartre presents man as a being vexed by a dire need to achieve contentment. I think this is what Sartre refers to as the supernatural being, which spiritual organizations recognize with deep esteem. I believe the intertwining of the issue in the material essence of an individual’s being, and in the physical environment enables people locate themselves within being. In light of this, consciousness forms the basis of conceptualizing likelihoods, and prompts their appearance, or elimination. On the other hand, Simone de Beauvoir’s philosophy is related to Sartre’s, in this respect: the latter acknowledges that woman exists (being), and then she is booked a place in “nothingness,” in a male chauvinistic society. The challenges that woman grapples with is what defines who women are, and acknowledges their being, which precedes their suffering. To Simone de Beauvoir, females are being classified in “nothingness,” and are being treated as man's absolute man’s slaves. ...
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