Questions on Hedonism, Utilitarianism, Norcross, Doctrine of Double Effect

Questions on Hedonism, Utilitarianism, Norcross, Doctrine of Double Effect Assignment example
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Philosophy
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Name Institution Instructor Course Date Philosophy Question 1 Response The history of Hedonism revolves around two damaging and false assumptions: that hedonism advocates for bodily pleasures only, and that they are degrading as well as invariably sinful. In fact, some philosophers seem too convinced and appear to share this distrust rational hedonism and body regarding intellectual and spiritual joys as lasting and very much less likely to result to inconvenient and painful consequences…

Introduction

With reference to his response, it is agreeable that ethical egoism reconciles zeal for seeking pleasure with altruism. In addition, Mill shows that ethical hedonism is true by exclaiming that if utopians maximized their benefits of deferred gratification and live life according to nature, reasoning rightfully, then virtue will foster their physical health inevitably (Philip 48). Physical health is of paramount importance mainly because it is necessary for any other pleasure. Question 2 Argument Mill argues that intellectual pleasures are superior to the sensual pleasures. According to his response, he argues so because with the manner in which he crucially claims, there are some pleasures that are more superior, qualitative, and quantitative than others. He asserts that intellectual pleasures are superior to sensual pleasures because of the fact that intellectual pleasures are mind related. Pleasures that relate to mind are more valuable and no ways in which one can counter balance them with any quantity of sensual pleasures in terms of value. Thus, intellectual pleasures are higher pleasures, a factor that makes them vastly superior (Philip 79). On the other end, sensual pleasures are mere sensations of the body. ...
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