Explain what the ancient Mesopotamians, Egyptians, Hebrews and Greeks thought and felt about happiness

Explain what the ancient Mesopotamians, Egyptians, Hebrews and Greeks thought and felt about happiness Term Paper example
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Philosophy
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What is happiness? This is a question that has begged to be answered over the ages and defies explicit definition even today. While it is unequivocal that the concept of happiness is universal in its different forms, its manifestation and motivation is subject to a myriad of factors ranging from social-cultural and religious on a communal scale narrowing to characters idiosyncrasies…

Introduction

Therefore, it is important to evaluate the perceptions of happiness by ancient civilizations namely the Greeks, Mesopotamians, Egyptians and Hebrews in order to understand their various interpretations and applications of the concept. Greek philosophers are easily the most influential figures in matters pertains philosophical thought and predictably, they had much to say about happiness. According to Socrates, popularly known as the father of philosophy, the key to happiness is to be found in incisive self-examination and critical questioning ones morality and self-confidence. He further postulated that a simple life in which one has nothing to lose is the one that guarantees happiness, as opposed to those seeking wealth and pleasure, guaranteed to bring frustrations at the expense of happiness. However, while Socrates’ ideals were similar to those of stoic scholars who also believed happiness was about suffering, he disparages activities such as drinking which he found to result in slurred speech and impaired judgment (McMahon 2006). ...
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