What exactly is Plato's ideal of the philosophical or examined life?

What exactly is Plato
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Philosophy
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The practical relevance in Plato’s teachings can be found in his ideals of how outlooks should be approached, allowing room for the development of truth. This means that facts should not just be accepted and shelved as an undeniable truth…

Introduction

These teachings are still studied today proving the amount of influence that this ancient Greek philosopher had during his time as he provided the world with new avenues of thought. His views on life tended to concentrate on factors such as the acquiring of knowledge and truth, the governance of the society as well as societal structure. Plato offers these musings via a number of dialogues and it has been said that some of his views were actually those of Socrates – his teacher which can be a safe assumption to make as many individuals are influenced by their mentors in their on works. Plato’s ideal of the physical life had one main theme in particular that recurred in may of his dialogues concerning the true nature of objects in existence and what an individual’s perception of this truth may be. He argues that what can be seen is not the exact reality and thus it can be stated that those who only use the sense of their surroundings to establish reality are off the mark and are only left with a vague idea of what the real truth is. Plato argues that something does not have to be tangible or visible for it to be real and those who believe so have in effect limited themselves from gaining the real truth (Plato 50). This concept is promoted in a number of his dialogues and is can be clearly seen in his allegory of the cave. In this analogy, ...
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