How Socrates, Plato and Aristotle view the role of education for the society and the individual

How Socrates, Plato and Aristotle view the role of education for the society and the individual Research Paper example
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Philosophy
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Submitted to: Name: University: Date: How Socrates, Plato and Aristotle view the role of education for the society and the individual The Greek philosophy focuses largely on many certain aspects of life and society. One of these factions or aspects is that of education…

Introduction

The accumulation of philosophies relating to education in Greek culture became known as the Educational Theory. The mentioned Educational Theorycan be regarding as a hypothetical educational assumption, or a thought, which acts a guide in explaining and the description of the practice of education. Socrates was one of the earliest Greek philosophers who can be credited for being one of the originators of the modern Western philosophy. It also believed that Socrates was a thinker and not a writer as the evidence suggests that he had minimal written accounts of this thoughts and philosophical processes. Despite these, Socrates is known as the Father of Modern Philosophy and is considered as one of the greatest thinkers of all time. Socrates, very aptly and very strategically divided his views about the imparting of education and knowledge. Socrates stated that as long as the goals of education are fulfilled, it is indeed worthwhile to gain knowledge and education. According to Socrates the goals of education were to realize what an individual can do and what an individual cannot do. Furthermore, the great philosopher did not discriminate when it came to the imparting of knowledge and believed that there was no regular authority for that. ...
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