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For Rousseau, "man is born free and everywhere he is in chains." Do you agree with this assessment? Discuss with reference to - Essay Example

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Undergraduate
Author : jboyle
Essay
Philosophy
Pages 6 (1506 words)

Summary

The Invisible Chain of Man “Man is born free and everywhere he is in chains” (Rousseau 141) is one of the famous lines of Jean Jacques Rousseau. Jean Jacques Rousseau is known as one of the most influential Genevan philosophers. His political and sociological ideas had been pivotal and influential of the French Revolution, the cultivation of Socialist theory, and in music (Dent)…

Extract of sample
For Rousseau, "man is born free and everywhere he is in chains." Do you agree with this assessment? Discuss with reference to

The first man who accustomed himself as an owner of a land had first brought the idea of tyranny and oppression in society. Prior to the idea, that society had succumbed to ownership; there have been less crime and hardship, and sorrow was out of sight. However, when man succeeded in the act of ownership with it began the invisible chain attached to every human being born. Furthermore, man emerged when he was first to think of himself, provide for his own needs, and was ignorant of his ability to own properties and be above with others. Nonetheless, the time came that he felt the difficulty to do things all by himself and do against the natural circumstances. The differing tides of the time, the changes of the environmental conditions, and other natural and unexpected circumstances had brought man to a point where he considered these as no longer natural. It became a significant source of hardship for him. In order to survive the hindrances, man needed to learn to be above other species. He needed to eat; therefore, he hunted down other species, which had brought him to think that he is above them. This superiority brought man to boast and take pride of himself. As a result, the solitary man had evolved into seeing his likeness to other human beings. ...
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