How is the Enlightenment connected to the Scientific Revolution? - Essay Example

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How is the Enlightenment connected to the Scientific Revolution?

People thought the globe was the midpoint of the cosmos (Bacon 1960). That meant that the moon, planets, and the sun revolved around the earth. Europeans used ideas based on the physical world while Romans and Greeks believed in the Bible. However, attitudes changed in the mid 1500. A spirit of curiosity gave rise to a scientific revolution (Burns 2003). Scholars were willing to question old ideas and the level of focus was improved with much observation. Europeans were leading in the exploration leading to discovery of new lands and the establishment of universities. Francis Bacon, an English writer, assisted in fostering this approach. He urged scientists to base their opinions on what they could see in the world (Bacon 1960). R. Descartes used mathematics and logic to exert his immense influence. In the mid 1600, Isaac Newton established the law of gravity. He used mathematics to show the law of gravity controlled the motion of the planets and objects on earth (Burns 2003). Paris became the European cultural center in 1700 (Oslar 2000) where people from the entire Europe gathered to new ideas about enlightenment. Marie Therese became popular for hosting and funding ideas on enlightenment. ...
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Enlightenment and Scientific Revolution Name: Instructor: Subject: Enlightenment referred to the ability to reason and use of knowledge and available tools to solve current difficulties. The enlightenment movement was an age of reason when scholars began to question traditional practices and sought to have the freedom of opinion and expression…
Author : reichertjarrett

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