Not Just Dependent Beings: A key premise in The Cosmological Argument

Not Just Dependent Beings: A key premise in The Cosmological Argument Essay example
Undergraduate
Essay
Philosophy
Pages 3 (753 words)
Download 0
Name Tutor Course Date NOT JUST DEPENDENT BEINGS: A KEY PREMISE IN THE COSMOLOGICAL ARGUMENT Introduction The Cosmological Argument argues on the existence of God. It is a posteriori argument (an argument depending on principle which can be known only by means of our experience in the world as opposed to a priori argument which bases on understanding and reflection on principles which are independent of our world experience)…

Introduction

The first three of the five arguments are versions of the Cosmological Argument. The first is the argument from the fact that there are things that are undergoing change in the world. He conclusively reasoned that there must ultimately be a causative of the change, which is itself unchanging. Secondly, he started from the fact that the existence of some things in the world is a cause of others. He conclusively reasoned that there must be an ultimate cause of existence; the existence of this cause is uncaused. Thirdly, he started from the factual existence of some things in this world, but we can with ease, imagine that they might not be existent; that they need not have at all existed. He reasoned to the conclusion that there must be a being that had to be that exists and could not have failed to be in existence (Rowe 21). These arguments from Aquinas undoubtedly prove the existence of a changer that is unchanging, an uncaused cause and a being that could not have failed to exist. They, however, fail to show proof for the existence of an omniscient, creator, omnipotent, supremely good theistic God, who is independent of the world (Rowe 22). ...
Download paper
Not exactly what you need?

Related papers

Rowe's Cosmological Argument.
Rowe’s Cosmological Argument is one example of theism oriented principles that argues that because the universe had a beginning, then it definitely had a cause since everything that comes into existence must have a cause (Rowe 11). The Cosmological Argument states as follows: …
Proving God's Existence is Not Quite a Necessary Task - Love, the Strongest Argument, is a Key
Apparently, even faith which is immaterial by nature is put to intense questioning merely because scientific endeavors have answered and fulfilled most of man’s quest for improving the quality and meaning of life. So no matter how strong God is perceived through faith, still, science is made to require evidence to support a spiritual conviction that there is God, the creator of all things…
Cosmological Argument. The forms of cosmological arguments.
Cosmological arguments usually strive to explain the existence of God in many forms. Many philosophers in the past, from Aristotle and Kalam to Aquinas, tried to argue the existence of God in different ways (Taliaferro 21). The several forms of cosmological arguments usually explain the existence of God in the following ways: that there is the existence of things, that it is possible for the same…
argument
God’s existence, Cosmological reasons Someone ensures the universe is in harmony. The earth revolves around the sun. The sun firmly stays comfortably in its preset place, the center of a nine planet solar system. The solar system shows that each of the nine planets do not collide against each other. The Milky Way is composed of many stars, comets, and other celestial objects. Humans cannot reach…
Argument
Descartes argues that the connection between mind and body is a wholly arbitrary without regard to the laws of physics; for instance he demonstrates that a particle striking another will move in a direction that is determined by the angle of the first particle. In contrary, in the human body, there is no connection between the physical sensations and the ensuing mental reaction; he argues that…
Kantian Argument
Budeau and Marshal Bedau and Cassell Budeau and marshal hold that the death penalty is morally wrong regardless of the crime committed by the offender. Both opponents of the death penalty have suggested that when analyzing whether a certain crime fit a given punishment, one must look at the impact of the punishment. This includes both the criminal and the society at large (Bedau and Cassell 118).…
Human Beings and the Natural World
The admiration given to the persons who rule, and to all who treasure the advantages or worldly "greatness" relies on nothing more considerable than the acquaintance of imagination. (Farrell, 2006)…