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Decision-making and Philosophy Part I: Philosophy and the Self - Essay Example

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College
Author : nicolasraegan
Essay
Philosophy
Pages 6 (1506 words)

Summary

Immanuel Kant and Unwanted Pregnancy Name Subject Teacher Date               Immanuel Kant and Unwanted Pregnancy The Life-Changing Decision A few years back, one of my neighbors, whom I would just call Michelle, had an unwanted pregnancy. It was something that resulted from her relationship with her boyfriend of only a few months…

Extract of sample
Decision-making and Philosophy Part I: Philosophy and the Self

I heard from other neighbors that she was so confused whether to have the baby aborted or not, for she was still in university at that time. Michelle’s father was just an ordinary office worker and her mother was a plain housewife and a mother of four small children. I did not know exactly how she struggled with her decision to save the baby and to take care of him. Nevertheless, she told me one day that although having to take care of the baby was something that dramatically affected the family financial situation in a negative way, she just felt that it was not the right thing to do if she had decided to have it aborted. The Nature of the Belief and the Beliefs and Values behind Such Decision Michelle’s family is a Catholic family and perhaps it is because of this that made her decide not to have the baby aborted. Catholics are Christians and thus believe in the sanctity of life and its greater value than money or other circumstances. According to Michelle, although her family knew that with the baby the financial situation will just grow from bad to worse, they helped her make a decision by telling her that regardless of the circumstances, the baby had to live for life was sacred. Her family believed this without any reason or any explanation. They simply just believed it. ...
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