Ideology of Advertising - Essay Example

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Ideology of Advertising

We live in the age of conspicuous consumption. We are proud of having an opportunity to buy more and more goods and products. We do not realize why do we really need all this stuff, but we DO realize that we really want it! A greedy worm lives inside of our minds and hearts and it eats out our moral principles, while filling the gaps in our minds and hearts with the ideas of greediness. It is better to talk about these related phenomena, i.e. advertising and ideology and explain the way they are related and what this relation means to us.
Ideals in Ads
"Advertising, as the mouthpiece for capitalism, presents values and assumptions that color consumers" perceptions of reality (Cunnigham 2003, p. 229). It is true, as we have already mentioned, because the pace of our world's development determines the principles of our performance in the real world though we look at reality through a prism of artificially created world of ads. Cunnigham (2003) develops the following argument: "Advertisers’ common defense – if you don’t like the advertising, don’t watch it or don’t buy the products it promotes. But do we have a choice?"
We can talk about a specific nature of advertising ideology. Very often not the interests of an individual, which lead to positive results, are taken into account, but a promotion of bad habits is usually adopted by the audience after consuming ads. The advertisement on TV promotes the images of slim women. Vice versa, ads promoting tobacco and alcohol are focused on the audience, which can easily consume these harmful goods. ...
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Summary

“The function of advertising is to ‘create a culture in which identity is fused with consumption. As a powerful force, “advertising has colonized the culture and driven out other things in favor of commercial discourse". …
Author : cecil08

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