Frankfurt account - Essay Example

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Frankfurt account

Human beings, however, can be said to possess second order desires with these desires, however, not being experienced by all people (Frankfurt 7). To my understanding, people who cannot use self-evaluation to validate their desire; therefore, deficient in second order desires, are referred to as wanton. According to Frankfurt, these second order desires are what distinguish a person from non-humans. Wantons or those without second order desires include small children, animals, and even adults who are not able to exhibit these desires. These non-persons are not bothered about will, and they do not have a care concerning where their life is going and how they could change it. In order to clarify the definition of a person, we can use the example of two child molesters. In this case, we can take the first child molester as having a first order desire to molest children given her affinity to do so, as well as having a second order desire that makes her desire to stop molesting children, although their urge may be uncontrollable. ...
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Name: Instructor: Course: Date: Frankfurt Account Harry G. Frankfurt starts his essay, Freedom of the Will and Concept of the Person, by pointing out the two different forms that desire takes. We are introduced to first order desires, which are those desires that a person has to either do or not do a thing or the other and second order desires that encompass those desires that use self-evaluation…
Author : ukulas

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