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Comparison and contrast of the apologia of Socrates and the defense speech of Gorgias: A Defense on behalf of Palamedes - Term Paper Example

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Undergraduate
Author : windlertobin
Term Paper
Philosophy
Pages 5 (1255 words)

Summary

Date Socrates defense against his case before the Athenian council are based on the principle of his curiosity and the facts that he seeks to comprehend. This is concerning and in response to his accusers that attempt to label him as an evil doer for seeking to acquire knowledge beyond that which is conventionally visible and understandable…

Extract of sample
Comparison and contrast of the apologia of Socrates and the defense speech of Gorgias: A Defense on behalf of Palamedes

Therefore, because of this his defense is not perfect, as it only addresses his accusers as a crowd and not as individuals who bring their arguments and cases against him, but are rather guarded by the crowd. In addition, his issues are that the arguments and cases against him have been built over a long time and not a one-time thing, which implies that the same people charging him feign ignorance over the actual value of his works and beliefs (Adams). With this in mind, his charges are not even valid or based on actual occurrences, but are just accusations that have developed over an extended period and terms of heresy from other people. This makes his defense a bit shaky as all cases against other philosophers who seek to gain an understanding and acquire an explanation of occurrences are leveled against him as the perpetrator of them all. In his defense, Socrates states that his role in life is to examine the wisdom of man and expose their false ways and wisdom as ignorance, which he says is part of why he is being charged. This is because his activities expose many prominent people and embarrass theme while Socrates gains acclaim from the youths of Athens (Tindale). ...
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