Got a tricky question? Receive an answer from students like you! Try us!

Hume's - Essay Example

Only on StudentShare
College
Essay
Philosophy
Pages 7 (1757 words)

Summary

Hume Institution Name Instructor Course Date According to Hume, a law of nature includes a homogeneous regularity of events. We establish decree of nature upon the basis of our knowledge of persistent juxtapositions of events or objects. A clear illustration of this, offered by Hume, is that “all men must die.” According to Hume, “it would be a miracle that a dead man should come to life.” Thus, Hume says that when we have a standardized understanding that verifies the existence of regularities of this type we have “a substantial testimony, from the nature of the verity, against the existence of the miracle.” Here, Hume is determined to interpret the fact that final principle by w…

Extract of sample
Hume's

Nevertheless, if a miracle occurs, we are asked to consider something that is divergent to all other understanding. Hume thus far argues that “miracles must be unique or (almost unique) occurrences otherwise fall within cumulative course of nature despite how rare and extraordinary the activity may be.”Provided with this interpretation of miracles, known desecrations of the decree of nature, how we should we analyze assertions that miracles have taken place? Hume depends on a principle that claims that a logical person proportions his belief to the testimony (Hume, 2007). Hume differentiates between two types of skepticism, that is, antecedent and resultant skepticism, both of which come in deep and decent style. Hume establishes the great type of skepticism with the cumulative suspicion of Descartes. These delves into questioning all former perceptions and thus far the acknowledgment of the senses. ...
Download paper
Not exactly what you need?

Related Essays

The Subordinate Role of Reason in Hume's Moral Philosophy
Hume thought that what we perceive become images, and these images or pictures of reality are manipulated by reason. But, there is no manipulating these perceptions without the prior perceptions or sensations first: “I shall endeavor to prove first, that reason alone can never be a motive to an action of the will; and secondly, that it can never oppose passion in the direction of the will” [Cahn and Markie, Ed., 244]. What Hume is arguing, can be described as presenting a very sharp or definite distinction between “reason” which he calls “utterly impotent” when contrasted with the…
3 pages (753 words)
Hume's Posteriori Argument against Miracles Is not Valid
The ‘a posteriori argument’ states that even if miracles were a possibility according to evidence, they in fact, have never occurred (Johnson & Anthony, 72). Hume’s ‘a posteriori argument’ has some merit from a general perspective, they are problematic from the perspective of an individual miracle test-case, i.e., the alleged resurrection of Jesus. I will argue that although the first of Hume’s three ‘a posteriori argument’s succeeds in showing that there may be no miracle proofs, it doesn’t show that there is not a sufficient probability for establishing our test case.…
6 pages (1506 words)
Kant's Response to Hume's Skepticism
Another problem that Kant had to content with was the general partition of causal labor between God and created organisms. The main question he faced during his time was the relationship between the causal activity and action of God, considered as the primeval creator and conserver of the world. Kant acknowledged the position that a theory of God’s causal role in the natural course of nature was a precondition of any rational metaphysics of extraordinary intercessions. His personal contribution of this role was influenced by his engagement with three contending theories of divine causation…
5 pages (1255 words)
Kant's Response to Hume's Skepticism
Hence, even though reasoning and experience designate that objects function in a predictable way, this somehow fails to necessarily provide evidence how objects will behave in the near future depending on their former interactions. To ascertain his claims, Hume puts forth the concept that causal affairs belong to two types of knowledge: matters of fact and relations of ideas. In order for anything to bring out idea relations, its divergent must be ludicrous. Hume argues that since relations of thoughts are known via rationale alone, they are vacuous in the sense that they do not declare…
6 pages (1506 words)
Descarte's and Hume's answer to Russell's question
His obsession in geometry, made him believe in certainty because geometry always gave a certain answer and not imaginations (Hattab 2007, p.51) He invented certainty basing on his logical doubtful whereby he doubted the existence of everything around him. He never imagined that something existed instead he had to be sure of the existence of that element by questioning. As the inventor of certainty, Descartes questioned the origin of his background and if really, God existed. Hume, on the other hand, is in total opposition of what Descartes thinks. He objects Descartes ideas and views…
4 pages (1004 words)
David Hume's An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding
On the other hand, Hume tells of ideas as being part of a copy principle from impressions, which means that ideas are derived from impressions and they directly correspond to the impression from which they are derived, to create a complete image of both. This he goes to state that ideas are thoughts, beliefs or memories that are directly connected to our memories, which may not serve as much of a distinction between the two, as it ties or binds the two aspects tightly. This is to mean that we construct ideas from impressions, where the mind looks at three crucial factors prior to generating an…
5 pages (1255 words)
Assess Hume's Contribution To The Philosophy Of Religion
Many theologians felt Hume as a threat to religion- he discussed the origin of theism- first polytheists because people feared uncontrollable natural phenomena-then monotheism as people’s understanding grew- Hume’s states that monotheism is dogmatic and intolerant- states that the idea of God is copied from our natural attributes which are augmented to infinity- states that he does not believe in the resurrection of Christ as he has not seen it himself- causes much discord with Christians- shows that men have preference for the unreasonable and untheoretical- a fact that can be proven in…
4 pages (1004 words)