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ABORTION AND EUTHANASIA - Essay Example

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Summary

Abortion can be defined as a deliberate action of a woman to terminate her pregnancy or to allow another person deliberately for terminating her pregnancy. Terminating a pregnancy means death of a fetus before its birth. …

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ABORTION AND EUTHANASIA

There are different theories established by many philosophers about termination of pregnancy and there are different laws about terminating a pregnancy. In some countries terminating a pregnancy is illegal while in other countries it is legal (Warren, 828). There are mainly two types of beliefs about abortion and some people believe that abortion should be prohibited on moral grounds as it is like killing a person while others believe that abortion should not be prohibited as it has nothing to do with morality and it is necessary for society, sometimes, to avoid unwanted situation (Warren, 832). Those who advocate for prohibiting abortion believe that abortion is killing a fetus before birth which is an act of murder on both human and moral grounds. They are of the opinion that the abortion can only be allowed in exceptional cases like when the life of mother is at stake or the pregnancy is a result of rape or forced sex or any similar situation. Those who believe that abortion should not be prohibited in case argue that besides danger to mother’s life and pregnancy as a result of rape or forced sex there are many more reasons which influence the decision of abortion. Sometimes women conceive due to failure of contraceptive measures and they are either not ready or not capable of bringing up a child and birth of a child can be a burden on them. ...
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