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Davidson argues that you can only find a solution to the problem of other minds if you take it that knowledge about one's own mi - Essay Example

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Date Three Varieties of Knowledge Introduction In the Article “Three varieties of knowledge” by Donald Davidson, it has been clearly depicted that there are three variables of knowledge that are interdependent and complementary in reaching a conclusion and making rational decision…

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Davidson argues that you can only find a solution to the problem of other minds if you take it that knowledge about one's own mi

In this relation, he asserts that the three knowledge forms a tripod in which the absence of any of them automatically makes it unable to stand; hence, it remains that the tripod must always be in the complementary of the thee cardinal categories of knowledge (Davidson, The essential 64). What is evident in the Donald’s argument is how evidence can be adduced in relation to the three knowledge. In regard to the knowledge of the mind and that of immediate surroundings, he states that they are not subject to much proof since they are directly construed by an individual and do not need much proof. This is because he claims that the knowledge of immediate world is subject to the functionality of the organs of senses (Davidson, The essential 99). Finally, he stipulates that the most complex knowledge is that of other people, for one to understand what others think about, one has to learn their behavior first and use that as evidence about his knowledge. In this case, he argues that what one knows about others dictates what is in his mind, which also combines those that he knows about his immediate environment making them interdependent. Explanation of the Logical Interdependence In brief, the term “logical interdependence” can be considered as two different words that can then be evaluated independently before they are enjoined in order to find their meaning. ...
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