Thomas Hobbes views on Hate Crimes

Thomas Hobbes views on  Hate Crimes Research Paper example
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Philosophy
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Name Professor’s Name Course Date Thomas Hobbes Views on Hate Crimes Thomas Hobbes views that hate as a crime is based on a number of aspects that can be related to one another, as they revolve a paradox of the presence and absence of the aspects. With this in mind, Hobbes is of the view that the presence of one thing also marks the absence of the other I relation to hating or loving the thing in question, in which case love and hate are locked in a vicious circle of contrast, comparison and direct dependence on one another…

Introduction

In relation to this, aversion refers to the state of being repelled by the object that one hate and this refers to the presence of the object, which in turn leads to the hate for the object (Herbert 98). The above is a strong view on hate crimes in that it is based on this that he is able to place a distinct definition to depict the difference between love and hate, and how the two relate to one another. This is by definition of the presence and absence of all the aspects of an object or the object in its entirety to e hated or loved. As such, hatred is the presence of that which one would like to avert from, as well as the presence of aspects that are of negative appeal to the person in question. Hobbes view goes as far as stating that without the presence of order in an indefinite manner is likely to cause the perpetration of conduct and actions that people please to do. ...
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