Mill and pleasure - Essay Example

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Mill and pleasure

According to Mill’s utilitarianism which presumes a hedonistic theory of value, only things of fundamental value are equated to happiness and they include pleasure and the lack of pain. He is of the view that as humans strives for individual happiness, so must they collectively struggle for the delight of the people. This view is supported by Plato whom according to, the society mirrors the soul of the individual first followed by the virtues of the society mirroring the virtues of the individual. Though he equates pleasure to happiness, he appreciates some pleasures being higher than others, “Not all pleasures have equal value.” Higher pleasures are more valuable than lower pleasures. For example Pleasures of the mind are ranked higher than those of the body or a pleasure that comes with helping a needy person is considered great as compared to the pleasure as a result of taking alcohol. Mill goes against the basic principle of ethics which presumes actions as being right if they promote pleasure of the most number. ...
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Summary

Introduction Pleasure, as define in the American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language (2009), is the state or feeling of being pleased or gratified, that which affords enjoyment or delight to an individual. Philosopher John Stuart Mill (1806-1873) in his works comes out strong in creative a constructive examination of the space and the position of people in it and particularly individual freedom and the well-being of humans…
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