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Hume & Schumacher - Essay Example

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Philosophy
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Name: Institution: Course: Date: David Hume and Schumacher: A Comparative Analysis Today’s world experiences an unprecedented attention being paid to the understanding of man’s ways of life and his behavior. People are more curious about knowledge than at any other point in time…

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Hume & Schumacher

In this research, philosophy has come to play a very critical role in the understanding of human life. It finds its applicability from simple life questions such as the definition of terms to more complex debates about the ultimate purpose of life as well as what is real and what is vague. One of the greatest philosophers ever seen in history was David Hume (1711-1776). His essays and publications are now used by scholars both in Philosophy and other academic disciplines. The purpose of this paper is to examine his views and arguments from the viewpoint of another great philosopher, Schumacher, E.F (1911-1977). David Hume is regarded as one of the greatest philosophers to have ever lived. His essays, Moral, Political and Literary are recognized as a great contribution to the 18th Century Philosophy and the succeeding years. Similarly, several outstanding philosophers such as Immanuel Kant and Jeremy Bentham have confessed being directly influenced by his works. Similarly, Charles Darwin attested to Hume as a central influence (Hume 34). Hume is honored for having written in probably every branch of Philosopher but more so in the area of human science. Some critics have referred to him as ‘our politics, religion and also our economy’. ...
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