Assessment of Plato's two arguments about knowledge in the Meno and the Phaedo

Assessment of Plato
Undergraduate
Term Paper
Philosophy
Pages 5 (1255 words)
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Name Instructor Course no. Date Deliberating on knowledge according to Plato’s Phaedo and Meno, respectively, the term “knowledge” lacks the one definition that encompasses in totality what knowledge is and what it entails. Philosophers have, for a long time, been at task to find the one definition that would cover knowledge completely, but that definition is still elusive…

Introduction

In both Meno and Phaedo, knowledge and learning are viewed as a recollection of what someone already knows. However, in Meno, Plato writes that knowledge is concerned with the recollection of necessary truths. In Phaedo, on the other hand, knowledge, according to Plato, is concerned with the acquisition of concepts, which are not necessarily truths (102b-c). In essence, Phaedo tries to imply that a person can gain knowledge simply by learning new concepts based on their individual opinions. The subject of debate in this essay is whether either form of knowledge can be independent of the other. Can a person claim to have knowledge about a subject by simply recalling some prior truths, or can a person learn new concepts based on a recollection of prior opinions? The idea of recollection or anamnesis, according to Plato, holds that if at all a person remembers something, they must have had prior knowledge of the subject (73c). Plato, in Phaedo writes that the fact that a person can hear or see something and recognize it, and even think of something alike, is all based on anamnesis (74c). In Phaedo, Plato gives an example of knowledge through recognition by stating that a person may see a lyre that reminds them of their lover (73c-e). ...
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