Votes for Women

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By 1900 the progress of new technologies provided women with a full range of work at such places as offices, typing pools, telephone exchanges, elementary schools and department stores. The central issue would seem to be not how it happened that men could have been so hide-bound as not to let women to vote, but rather how it happened that, at such a break of emancipation working for their benefit, and having the deeply ingrained Victorian trust in giving the vote to the trustworthy, women should have lost their chance so completely that by the year 1914 the right to vote seemed further off than ever.


He was in a very powerful position, as there was no Liberal MP who could even try to oppose him. It is well known that Asquith was totally against the campaign for women's vote right. Partly this was so because of the way he considered the voting: he did not think there was need for each individual to need to have a vote, he considered that such representation was more an issue of representing a class or community. That is why one man could represent the ideas of all of his family. Moreover, there were lots of serious problems facing the Parliament within 1900 - 1914, and Asquith was sure that "women's rights to vote" was a minor issue. In addition he paid no attention to demonstrations while he was sure that they did not reflect people's thinking.
There was another aspect. If the law giving women the vote was ever going to be passed, it would have to happen in the Parliament. That means that such parties as the Liberals, the Conservatives and the Labour Party would have a part to play. ...
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