British Democracy and Iraq War - Essay Example

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British Democracy and Iraq War

They also argued that there was need to liberate the Iraq people from the oppressive regime which was not democratic and was abusing the human rights of its citizens (Armstrong, Farrell, & Maiguashca, 2005).
Democratic norms are in most cases not perceived to be relevant to the foreign and international policies of a country. However, in the consideration of the democracy framework of various governments a number of critical questions arise. The first one is about respect of the international law by a country, basing on the fact that such a government cannot easily acquire the democratic tribute in regard to the rule of law locally if it is capable of violating the rule of law in a foreign country. The international law is much vaguer compared to the domestic one, but majority of the international lawyers are in agreement that Iraq's invasion by both the United States of America and Britain was a blatant breach on the charter of the United Nations. The charter is very clear and stipulates that armed forces can only be used in a case of self defense or when the United Nations Security Council explicitly authorizes use of such force (Vickers, 2004).
Tony Blair in attacking Iraq had complete disregard of the United Nation's charter in fact, his speech in 1999 whi ...
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Summary

The Iraq war was initiated by the United States of America on the grounds that Iraq was being ruled by a very oppressive regime and that its people needed to be liberated from it. They were later joined by other countries such as Britain, the American's invaded Iraq since their foreign policies allowed them to do so although they were not in agreement with the resolutions of the United Nations which is mandated to intervene on international matters…
Author : neil85

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