Theories of motivation

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Motivation has been and is still an important issue in human resource management. Various theories have been established which raises the issue of what motivates employees to do their best in the accomplishment of a particular task (Finemann, Sims & Yannis 2006).


After an analysis of each theory's strengths and weaknesses and a comparison of the two, it will conclude with its main findings.
Maslow strongly believes that motivation arises from need. Maslow placed an individual's needs on a hierarchy of importance and provides the following first four levels: physiological; safety/security; belongingness and love; and esteem (Morgan 1989). An important application to Maslow's theory is that once one understands the need level of employees, it is easier to design programs that will trigger self-motivation. Maslow's hierarchy of need has been widely recognized because of its "intuitive logic" and "case of understanding" (Knights and Hugh 2007). It should also be regarded its major strength is its unique recognition that motivation is not just attained through monetary benefits. This motivation theory also emphasizes the individuality of a person. However, the theory is flawed because it cannot be validated through research neither do Maslow provide empirical support for his claims (Knights and Hugh).
Braden asserts in his equity theory that we are motivated when we perceive that we are being treated in a manner that is equal to the manner in which all other employees are being treated (Daft 2007; Knights and Hugh 2007). ...
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