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Justin Martyr - Research Paper Example

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Undergraduate
Research Paper
Religion and Theology
Pages 12 (3012 words)

Summary

Justin Martyr Author’s Number Date Table of Contents Justin Martyr 3 Thesis 3 Introduction 3 Life 4 Work 6 The First Apology 6 The Second Apology 7 Dialogue with Trypho 8 Contribution of the Church Father, Justin 8 Justin’s Perceptions on the Law 10 Justin’s Philosophical Orientation 11 Bibliography 14 Justin Martyr Thesis The life, work, and contribution of Justin Martyr (considered as the first true Christian) to the church has made significant contribution to the understanding the Scripture both from the Old Testament and New Testament perspectives…

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Justin Martyr

Introduction Justin is one of the most significant Greek apologists of the second century. No one actually knows his exact date and place of birth. The Apologies (the First and the Second Apology) and Dialogue may indicate his time and place of birth. Most people indicate that he was born around 100 AD. However, his place of birth is not clearly known, some indicates that Justin was born of pagan parents in Palestine around 100 A.D. and died as a martyr in 165 A. D. Others indicate that he was probably born in Flavia Neapolis (Nablus) around the same time. In the Dialogue, he narrates of his conversion to Christianity. This is after he had experimented with several Greek philosophies such as the Pythagorean, Peripatetic, and Stoic1. As a Christian, Justin continued to travel as an itinerant teacher. He was devoted to defend Christianity during his travels. Upon arrival in Rome, Justin established a school there. However, he was denounced by his adversaries and martyred in 165 along with other six companions. ...
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