Discuss the invasions of the barbarians and the influence of St. Augustine and the Celts as well as the rise of monasticism and

Discuss the invasions of the barbarians and the influence of St. Augustine and the Celts as well as the rise of monasticism and  Essay example
College
Essay
Religion and Theology
Pages 3 (753 words)
Download 0
Author Tutor Course Date Introduction Christian monasticism represents the devotional practice of individuals who live ascetic and characteristically cloistered lives dedicated to Christian worship. The practice started to develop early in history of the Christian Church, molded around scriptural examples and ideals inclusive of those within the Old Testament, yet not mandated as an institution within the scriptures…

Introduction

The paper explores the rise of monasticism and Islam, the invasions of the barbarians and the influence of St. Augustine and the Celts. Discussion Celtic Christianity represents features of Christianity that were prominent across Celtic world in the Early Middle Ages. A spotlight on monasticism centering on the sequestered life of monks and nun provides an example of Celtic Christian practice. True ecclesiastical power within the Celtic world lay in the hands of monasteries instead of bishops of dioceses, and the ideal of monasticism collectively esteemed within Celtic Christianity (Noble 192). St. Benedict established his Monastic Rule, which established a system of regulations for the basis and running of monasteries. Monasticism gained prominence throughout Europe and gave rise to numerous early center of learning. The way of addressing monastic varies between the diverse Christian traditions based on their rank and monastic tradition. As early as the 3rd century, the ascetical life had attained a noteworthy expansion within the church in North Africa witnessed by the presence of existence of number monasteries at Carthage by the year 400. ...
Download paper
Not exactly what you need?

Related papers

St. Augustine's election VS free will
According to St. Augustine sin is the consequence of free will of human. In the words of Allen (2003), “According to St. Augustine's free will theodicy (AFWT), moral evil attends free will”. It is also believed that God has created human with the eligibility of enjoying free will. Free will in this sense denotes having the capability to cooperate with God, i.e. to do the right as well as wrong…
The Impact of St. Augustine's Life
The Life of Augustine Augustine’s life dates from 354 to 430. His father (Patricius) was a pagan of Roman decent and a member of the council while his mother (Monica) on the other hand was a Christian. This indicates that he had to deal with contrasting situations very early in his life and is possibly an indication of the reason for his engagement with several religions. He grew up in humble…
The Preaching of Augustine
He was truly loyal, devoted and faithful priest & his aim of life was the propagation of Bible’s message in right direction. His approach towards Bible was entirely different from other Bishops as he read it very intensely and spiritually. The influential writings of Augustine make him one of the most prominent and outstanding theologian and philosopher of all times1. The preaching’s of…
Saint Augustine: Grace and Free Will
In his approach on the free choice on the will, he assumes that we cannot deny that we posses free will. Instead, he defines the good will in terms of the will that seeks to live both a good and an upright life in attaining a perfect wisdom that assumes it as free. The catechism in the catholic church have seconded to this asserting that endowed with the spiritual soul, free will and with…
Monasticism
Ordinary Christians usually juggle family, work and children nurturing to bring up a Godly society while one devoted to monastic life renounces family life and embraces celibacy. This ensures that the entire time one has is entirely for God and the tasks that entail his lifestyle. For example, St. Anthony after having observed asceticism and all its aspects, decided to seclude himself to a lonely…
Saint Augustine of Hippo and his Confessions
Monica. It can be deduced through his works that his main goal is to find the spiritual truth, and due to himself not acknowledging the spiritual presence of God everywhere he had an early life full of sins. He died in 430, just when the Vandals were starting to besiege Calama, where he stayed for the rest of his life.4 As a reformed man who used to live in a life of sin, his book Confessions was…
Augustine as a Mentor, Edward L. Smither
In the first chapter he explains that the figure of Augustine interests him so much because of the impact that this man had on other spiritual leaders of his generation. He was, in effect, a pastor to other pastors, and his writings serve as a set of textbooks which other spiritual leaders can use as they prepare themselves for the many challenges of ministering to other people. It is this role as…