The significance of the crucifixion to Anglicans today. - Essay Example

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The significance of the crucifixion to Anglicans today.

The doctrines that are directly derived from the events covered in the crucifixion include the salvation of man and the atonement of sin. All the events of the crucifixion play a symbolic role in the life of an Anglican Church believer, and the crucifixion of Jesus holds a lot of meaning and significance for the Anglican believer of today (Williams, 2007). Areas of significance and the meaning of the crucifixion include that the death of Jesus, which paid the price required for redemption from sin. Secondly, the crucifixion unites Christians with the life of Jesus – who took the burden of setting men free – and offers them the commands and the ways to live in the world. Discussion The importance of the crucifixion to the modern Anglican believer is modelled through the context of the crucifixion of Jesus, though his subjection to a Roman capital punishment, which was ordinarily used to punish offenders that committed seditious or political crimes (Williams, 2007). ...
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The crucifixion refers to the events of the 1st century AD, when Jesus the son of God was arrested, tried and then sentenced to be terrorized and later crucified. …
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