The Impact of St. Augustine's Life

The Impact of St. Augustine
Ph.D.
Research Paper
Religion and Theology
Pages 13 (3263 words)
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Spiritual leaders exemplify themselves by the way they live and the way they impact the lives of others. This normally determines how they are viewed by their congregation and those who hear their word and see their deeds…

Introduction

The Life of Augustine Augustine’s life dates from 354 to 430. His father (Patricius) was a pagan of Roman decent and a member of the council while his mother (Monica) on the other hand was a Christian. This indicates that he had to deal with contrasting situations very early in his life and is possibly an indication of the reason for his engagement with several religions. He grew up in humble circumstances in Thagaste which is now Souk Ahras, Algeria where he lived from 354-366. This little town was nothing compared to the centers of learning in the Roman Empire which is known for cultivating scholars (Smith 2008, 1). However, it was the place of birth of one of the most exemplary individual that graced the earth and who would later become an Archbishop. It was while living in Thagaste that he studied Greek and Latin. 2.1 Madaurus 366 - 370 He lived in Madaurus from 366-370 when he attended secondary school. He also studied Latin and Literature in Madaurus. It was during this period that he came under the influence of the doctrine of Cicero which he credited for his rather lengthy association with philosophy, psychology, human nature and religion (EGS Digital Library). Augustine went back to Thagaste for a short while since his parents did not have the money to send him on to university. While there he was engaged in practices that were similar to his father. Although his mother dissuaded him, he persisted. This he spoke of in Book ll of Confessions. ...
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