Religion and Theology
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Orchestrating social event that includes the grief of loosing a loved one is a significant part of our society that is linked up with various factors. In the light of memories and rituals, these factors set up the funeral in communities where memorial construct highly differentiates social identities for the dead.


It is in the remembrance of a loved one that death event is organised and celebrated, though it is manifested into the colours of grief and sorrow. Rather than confiscation, an 'invisibility' of sorts sets in, items being dispersed or located within secular 'non-death' settings where their significance remains vital only for the bereaved.
The social celebration of death depends upon the relationships death set up as a tool for memory and material culture. Death can be understood as a life crisis which is estimated by some conjuncture of changes where transformations of the physical body, social relations and cultural configurations are set up by the society. A dying experience, death and the response of the society towards death acts as a phase of transition involving loss and adjustment (Peveto & Hayslip, 2005, p. 1), therefore death is treated differently in every culture, religion and race. Examining the ways in which memory comes into play, death provides the opportunity to analyse various aspects of the process of dying, mourning and grief. Facing death, either of the self or of others, has come to entail ritualised social practices that mobilise domains of material objects, visual images and written texts.
In the West death experience is counted towards attending a diverse range of materials, which are not only associated with death in historical and con ...
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