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St. Thomas Aquinas on Politics and Ethics - Essay Example

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Author : ellis84

Summary

Many elements of modern Western world views are inherited from the Greco-Roman and late antique and medieval Christian philosophies. Schools of thought within them, however, did not develop separately but rather since the 1st century A.D. they were mingling together and combined old traditional world views with a newer world outlook…

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St. Thomas Aquinas on Politics and Ethics


In general, for the formation of the Christian thought probably the most important was its early period when this presently dominant religion was searching to define itself. The Romans widely propagated Greek culture and in this way Christianity found itself in the Greco-Roman society amidst pronounced philosophical and religious confrontation. It was integration of competing philosophies and of the rich Hellenistic philosophical heritage into the Christian world view that served as a winning strategy for the Christian religion. Before the first statements regarding the general doctrine of the church were made in the 4th century, philosophical theology was becoming more important than direct revelation in determining the essential Christian doctrines. At the same time, not all of the early church scholars had the same view on the available heritage of secular knowledge, which was mainly Greek. ...
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