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Israeli-palestinian conflict - Essay Example

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Religion and Theology
Pages 4 (1004 words)

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Israeli-Palestinian Conflict: Humanitarian Intervention The Israeli-Palestinian conflict has been ongoing for over 60 years. Besides the fight over control of territory, the conflict also symbolizes the longstanding disagreements between the Israelis and Palestinians over a number of issues like water, borders, security and Jerusalem…

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Israeli-palestinian conflict

In this context, authors like Thompson contend that some form of humanitarian intervention could be an alternate solution to this impasse (138). This paper describes some of the factors that have prevented such an intervention and also discusses whether such a solution is viable in the modern context. Obstacles to Humanitarian Intervention Consider the recent military operation by the Israeli Defense forces in 2009. The military claimed that it was pursuing Palestinian militants hiding in the Gaza Strip, whom it accused of firing rockets into Israeli towns and cities. The resulting campaign led to the deaths of over 1000 residents, many of whom were children (Brown 82). Israel had also enforced a blockade on the Gaza Strip, forcing over 100,000 residents to flee. While such military campaigns have been extremely violent, Israel claims that it is acting in self-defense. The Israeli government has also demolished several government buildings, schools and mosques in the region as it alleges that these are being used to store missiles and serve as hideouts for militants. For over 3 months, residents had no access to food or water as they could not venture out and had no supplies due to the blockade. Gallagher notes that Israel has breached international humanitarian conventions by not providing help to the starving and wounded (72). ...
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